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Update: Roger Stone reacts to Jerome Corsi interview about Russia collusion investigation

Roger Stone speaks with CBS12 News. (WPEC)

UPDATE: This story was updated after an extensive interview with Roger Stone.

With Jerry, they're trying to drum up some half-a** perjury charge ...

Political mastermind, Roger Stone, wants to clarify a few points Jerome Corsi made in a recent interview with Howard Stirk Holdings' Armstrong Williams.

Stone told Sinclair Broadcast Group Sunday that the investigation against Corsi was manufactured by prosecutors to connect him with WikiLeaks and Russia. He said investigators have targeted Corsi because of an email Corsi sent him about WikiLeaks.

"Jerry [Corsi] emailed me about the timeline of when WikiLeaks was going to drop information to damage Hillary [Clinton]. As it turns out, it was all false. None of the timeline proved to be accurate," Stone said. "Jerry got the wrong information," he said.

Something both Corsi and Stone agree with is that the special prosecutor's office is trying to charge someone with a crime he didn't commit.

"With Jerry, they're trying to drum up some half-a** perjury charge to build their case, but they have nothing," Stone said.

Corsi told Williams that the special prosecutor's office is using illegal tactics to get him to turn on his longtime associate.

"They wanted me to plead to a crime I didn't commit," Corsi said. "These special prosecutors are politically motivated. They don't have a crime."

Corsi says he lied to protect Stone. Stone denies that claim because he says the timeline of events proves otherwise.

"I presented a cover story for Roger," Corsi said in his interview with Williams. Corsi drafted a memo in August 2016 explaining that a tweet Stone sent about 'the Podesta's' referred to research he was doing at the time, looking into lucrative business deals that Podesta and Clinton allegedly struck with Russian companies.

The memo was "a public relations fabrication" to help Stone, Corsi said. He acknowledged, "Yes, it was a lie."

Corsi's memo, in turn, was submitted as part of Stone's sworn testimony when he was questioned by the House Intelligence Committee last year. When the federal grand jury considered these facts, they expressed concerns that Corsi may have conspired to aid Stone in committing perjury.

Stone told Sinclair that Corsi was making that part up.

"Cover up of what? My tweet was not controversial when I posted it and had no commentary whatsoever on social media or in media coverage and would not become controversial until six weeks later when WikiLeaks published John Podesta‘s emails," Stone said. Corsi‘s claim that he told me the Podesta‘s emails had been stolen is unsupportable buy anything other than his memory. There’s no email or text message that proves this largely because it is 100% false," Stone said.

Stone claims the general public knew about emails that would be damaging to the Clinton campaign because WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange had been doing TV interviews about it. He says he reached out to WikiLeaks afterward and they didn't want to work with him.

"Anyone who had any political experience would have asked for the emails. That's politics," Stone said. "If there's anything that can give you a competitive advantage, you're going to try to get that info," Stone said.

"They're after me for two reasons. I wrote "The Clintons' War on Women" and I'm really effective," Stone said. "If I wasn't so influential in the political world, they wouldn't want anything to do with me."

Below is the original story published about an interview with Jerome Corsi on Friday, December 27, 2018.

Author and political commentator Jerome Corsi explained how he was drawn into the special counsel investigation as the suspected "lynchpin" connecting associates of Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign to the Russian government.

In a Friday interview with Howard Stirk Holdings' Armstrong Williams, Corsi opened up about spending forty hours with Robert Mueller's prosecutors and making two appearances before a federal grand jury.

The process resulted in a plea deal offered by Mueller, which Corsi refused to accept claiming it was"fraudulent" and intended to target President Donald Trump. Under the deal, Corsi was asked to plead guilty to lying to federal prosecutors.

"They wanted me to plead to a crime I didn't commit," Corsi said. "These special prosecutors are politically motivated. They don't have a crime."

Mueller has not filed charges against Corsi, who has often been criticized as a conspiracy theorist. However, Corsi believes he could still be indicted.

Corsi became a subject of interest in the Russia investigation earlier this year as Mueller was honing in on possible links between the Trump campaign and WikiLeaks. Corsi is a longtime associate of former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone, who is now under investigation for allegedly coordinating with WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange in releasing thousands of emails stolen by Russian hackers from the Hillary Clinton campaign and Democratic National Committee. Stone has not been charged by the special counsel but was accused by Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee of lying to Congress.

"Robert Mueller and his prosecutors figured I had a connection to Julian Assange—that I could link Roger Stone to Julian Assange and from Stone back to Trump. And that was going to be their collusion theory for the theft of the DNC emails by the Russians," Corsi explained. "They figured I was the lynchpin because I could link Roger Stone to Assange. It just wasn't true. I couldn't do it."

Stone has been under scrutiny for having advance knowledge of WikiLeaks' intention to dump thousands of emails stolen from Clinton's campaign chairman John Podesta in October 2016. In multiple public statements, Stone bragged about his contacts and appeared to have first-hand knowledge of Assange's plans to release Podesta's emails ahead of the November 2016 election.

In an August 2016 tweet foreshadowing WikiLeaks' release of its final tranche of stolen emails, Stone tweeted, "Trust Me, It Will Soon The Podesta's Time In The Barrel. #CrookedHillary."

A few days later, Stone contacted Corsi and asked him to create an "alternative explanation" of the tweet that would remove the suggestion that it was related to WikiLeaks.

"I presented a cover story for Roger," Corsi admitted in his interview with Armstrong. Corsi drafted a memo in August 2016 explaining that the tweet referred to research he was doing at the time, looking into lucrative business deals that Podesta and Clinton allegedly struck with Russian companies.

The memo was "a public relations fabrication" to help Stone, Corsi said. He acknowledged, "Yes, it was a lie."

Corsi's memo, in turn, was submitted as part of Stone's sworn testimony when he was questioned by the House Intelligence Committee last year. When the federal grand jury considered these facts, they expressed concerns that Corsi may have conspired to aid Stone in committing perjury.

Mueller's team was also interested in Corsi's alleged ties to WikiLeaks based on his public predictions that Assange would release Podesta's emails and Corsi's contact with Assange's attorney, Ted Malloch. U.S. intelligence agencies concluded that WikiLeaks acted as a "cutout" for Russian government hackers to publish the stolen emails for the purpose of helping Donald Trump get elected and hurting Hillary Clinton.

According to documents released by the special counsel, Stone sent Corsi an email July 25, 2016, demanding someone get in contact with Assange. The email read, "Get to Assange at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London and get the pending WikiLeaks emails." Corsi said he promptly forwarded the email to Ted Malloch.

When Corsi was interviewed by Mueller's prosecutors, they asked if he had ever wanted someone to "go see" Assange. Corsi answered no and was accused of lying to federal agents. He amended his testimony but was later asked to confess to the lie in the plea agreement offered by Mueller.

Corsi, who is known for purveying conspiracy theories, defended his predictions of WikiLeaks pre-election disclosure. Between information from Roger Stone and a source, "Lou Hodges," who gave Corsi thousands of pages detailing how the DNC server was configured, Corsi deduced that Assange would release another tranche that included "the mother load," namely, Podesta's emails.

Prosecutors grilled Corsi for twenty hours about his alleged ties to Assange. "They were sure I had to have a source and I didn't have a source," he said.

Ultimately, Mueller asked him to plead guilty to lying about the July 2016 email and knowingly creating the false memo used by Roger Stone in his testimony before Congress.

Corsi claims he was unfairly targeted by the special counsel's office as part of an attempt to discredit President Trump and remove him from office. "Their questions were all biased with a predetermined concept of the crime they envision happened, Russian collusion, and the person ultimately responsible, Donald Trump," he told Williams.

As a result of his involvement in the investigation, Corsi has faced financial hardship and, according to a $350 million lawsuit against Robert Mueller, suffered irreparable harm personally and professionally. The Justice Department and special counsel's office were unable to comment on the lawsuit.

Earlier this month Corsi's attorneys filed a lawsuit in the D.C. District Court accusing special counsel Robert Mueller of illegal surveillance, leaking grand jury information and pressuring their client to give false testimony.

In addition to Mueller, the suit names the Justice Department, Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency as plaintiffs and demands $350 million in damages and compensation.

According to the legal complaint, Mueller and his staff threatened to indict Corsi and "effectively put him in federal prison for the rest of his life" unless Corsi agreed to provide "false testimony" about his and others' alleged involvement in the Russian election interference.

According to the legal complaint, Mueller's actions amount to a "legal coup d'etat" that was "designed to remove the current president of the United States for political and other improper purposes."

In addition, Corsi's attorneys claim the federal government is involved in "ongoing" surveillance on their client. Corsi's attorney Larry Klayman did not respond when asked for evidence of illegal surveillance or a timeline of when it allegedly began. Corsi argued that Mueller's prosecutors had access to information about him that "had to come from intelligence sources."

Mueller and the Justice Department have also been accused of leaking information about Corsi's grand jury appearance to reporters with the intent to damage his reputation.

Corsi is scheduled to have his first hearing next Thursday, Jan. 3 in Washington, D.C. The federal government requested the hearing be delayed because of the ongoing government shutdown. Judge Richard Leon denied the government's request.

Corsi said he plans to be in court for the first hearing.

Jerome Corsi has written a number of conspiratorial books, including the New York Times bestsellers, "The Obama Nation: Leftist Politics and the Cult of Personality," and "Killing the Deep State: The Fight to Save President Trump."

Earlier this week Corsi released an audiobook detailing his forty hours of interviews with the special counsel's office. The book is titled, "Silent No More: How I Became a political Prisoner of Mueller's 'Witch Hunt.'"

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