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5,000 flower memorial calls for an end to U.S. participation in Yemen war

Activists will place thousands of flowers on the US Capitol lawn to memorialize Yemeni children killed or harmed by the U.S backed Saudi Bombings of Yemen. (Caroline Patrickis/ABC7)

Activists will place thousands of flowers on the US Capitol lawn to memorialize Yemeni children killed or harmed by the U.S backed Saudi Bombings of Yemen.

The demonstration planned by international advocacy group Avaaz comes on the heels of the Saudi Crown Prince's visit to the United States.

The Saudi crown prince, will arrive in DC on Monday for a US tour, and is meeting Trump on Tuesday for bilateral talks. The crown prince was in London last week, where he faced protests over the killing of Yemeni civilians.

Senator Bernie Sanders, Senator Mike Lee, and Senator Chris Murphy will be in attendance for the memorial and have introduced a resolution to stop U.S military participation in the Saudi-led war on Yemen. The Senate is expected to vote on the legislation on Tuesday.

Avaaz reports that since 2015, a military coalition led by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates has carried out an indiscriminate bombing campaign across Yemen and enforced a crippling blockade on food, medicine, and fuel.

Activisits from Avaaz, MoveOn.org, and Win Without War will lay out 5,000 flowers. “We’ve laid 5,000 flowers on the Capitol lawn to honor the children who have been killed or brutally maimed in Yemen. As the Saudi crown prince meets with President Trump, we’re here to show the cost of this war on children. Hundreds are dead, thousands are starving, and millions have no school to attend,” explained Nick Kimbrell, Senior Campaigner at Avaaz.

"The crisis in Yemen is a humanitarian catastrophe affecting millions of innocent civilians, and it is completely unconscionable for the United States military to be involved in this disaster. Congress must reassert its constitutional role, vote in favor of this resolution, and prevent the United States from being sucked deeper and deeper into another quagmire war," said Alexander McCoy, a member of Common Defense and a Marine Corps veteran who served in Saudi Arabia.

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