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Should people wade in the WWII Memorial pools?

The climbing temperatures and increasing number of tourist in Washington, D.C. are reigniting the debate over whether people should wade into the pools at the World War Two Memorial. (MGN Online)

The climbing temperatures and increasing number of tourists in Washington, D.C. are reigniting the debate over whether people should wade into the pools at the World War Two Memorial.

As The Washington Post's Mary Hui described, despite signs indicating entering the water is not allowed, the summer presents visitors to the monument with a moral question: is it appropriate to wade in the waters of a monument meant to honor the lives of those killed in World War Two?

"There are many who are shocked by the scene of hundreds of tourists wading in the shadows of the memorial's majestic stone slabs," Hui wrote.

"To them, the contrast between the hallowed space of the memorial and the almost water-park ambiance is jarring."

Though Hui spoke with many people who did not find the behavior unacceptable, including one art critic who thought it was "wonderful and respectful towards what veterans fought for," to turn the pool into a place for recreation.

All arguments aside, wading is prohibited in the pools, but enforcing that presents another difficulty.

A spokeswoman from the Park Services told Hui that delinquent behavior is a "challenge" that they struggle with throughout the city.

Faced with those who chose to defy the regulations put in place by the Park Service, its staff is limited in what they can do to stop them.

"There is not much officials can do," Hui wrote, citing the park spokeswoman.

With little ability to enforce the rules, park officials are left witnessing people disobey them as the controversy continues through another summer season.



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