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      Eleanor Holmes Norton on Rush Limbaugh: 'He has his own sexual problems'

      Holmes-Norton on Limbaugh: 'He has defamed women in the U.S. who use contraceptives.' (Photo: Associated Press/Dan Correia)

      Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-Washington) had some strong words for Rush Limbaugh on Friday in the wake of his continuous attacks on Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke.

      "People have always felt that Limbaugh has his own sexual problems and he seems to be airing them through Sandra Fluke," Holmes Norton told ABC7 News on Friday.

      The District's delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives was the one who arranged for Fluke to talk about religious freedom and contraception in front of a Congressional committee.

      PHOTOS: Rush Limbaugh no stranger to multiple controversies

      That testimony is what set Limbaugh off on what is now a three-day tirade against Fluke, women at Georgetown and contraception in general.

      Holmes Norton, though, is having none of it.

      "He has defamed women in the U.S. who use contraceptives," she said. "He does not deserve to be in the same room with me or Sandra Fluke."

      On Friday, Limbaugh continued delivering an opinion that has already seen him call Fluke a "slut" and "prostitute," say she should post videos of herself having sex online and offer to purchase aspiring for all women at Georgetown to "put between their knees."

      Georgetown students have reacted angrily to Limbaugh's comments about Fluke and the university. Despite her strong rebuke, Holmes Norton wishes people simply stop listening to Limbaugh.

      "Limbaugh lives off the bigger than big lie, so nobody pays much attention to (him)," she said. "His off-the-wall comments don't deserve a dignified response."

      In a letter to the university community released Friday, Georgetown President John DeGioia called Limbaugh's statements 'misogynistic and vitriolic' and called on Georgetown to revisit the ideals of civility in communication.