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      Supreme Court considers Obama health care overhaul

      Demonstrators are gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court as the high court is considering President Obama's health care overhaul.

      (ABC7, AP) — Students at Thomas Jefferson High in Alexandria, Va., traveled 12 miles to East Capitol Street in D.C. today to get a first-hand look at what they're learning about in school — the challenge over President Obama's health care overhaul.

      "I feel like I'll get a little bit of a better education here than at school with some of my classes," said Willis Johnston, a senior at the school.

      During today's session, the justices considered whether it's premature for them to rule on the merits of the case, since Americans aren't yet being forced to pay the penalty for not having the insurance. But the justices indicated the issue won't stand in the way of a ruling.

      Tomorrow, when justices hear arguments over the constitutionality of the requirement that Americans buy health insurance, is expected to be the most crucial in the three days of debate.

      Under the new health care law, taxpayers who don't purchase health insurance would have to report that omission on tax returns for 2014 and would pay a penalty along with federal income tax on returns due by April 2015. Among the issues is whether that penalty is a tax.

      Protesters from both sides camped out to demonstrate in favor or against the bill from lower temperatures and wind Monday night.

      "I'm a little bit on the fence. I think it'll be interesting to see which points they bring up," said Chris Groskaufmanis, Thomas Jefferson High senior.

      During the hearing, the questions came so quickly at times that the justices interrupted each other.

      At one point, Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sotomayor started speaking at the same time.Chief Justice John Roberts, acting as traffic cop, signaled Ginsburg to go first, perhaps in a nod to her seniority.

      Only Justice Clarence Thomas, as is his custom, stayed out of the fray.

      Attorney General Eric Holder, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama and Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi were in the crowd that filled the courtroom's 400 seats.

      Outside the court building, about 100 supporters of the law walked in a circle holding signs that read, "Protect my healthcare," and chanting, "Care for you, care for me, care for every family."

      A half-dozen opponents shouted, "We love the Constitution!"

      Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum was there, too, declaring anew that GOP front-runner Mitt Romney has no standing to challenge Obama on the law since Massachusetts passed a somewhat similar version when Romney was governor.

      Santorum said, "If you really want Obamacare repealed there's only one person who can make that happen."

      A four-person student band from Howard University was part of the group favoring the law, playing New Orleans-style jazz tunes.

      The law, much of which has still to take effect, would require almost all Americans to obtain health insurance and would extend coverage to more than 30 million people who now lack it.

      The law would be the largest expansion in the nation's social safety net in more than four decades.

      People hoping for a glimpse of the action had waited in line all weekend for the relatively few seats open to the public.

      The justices allotted the case six hours of argument time, the most since the mid-1960s.

      Nurses Lauri Lineweaver and Laura Brennaman, who are completing doctoral degrees, had been waiting since noon Sunday and got tickets to see arguments.

      "It's an honor to be in the court," said Lineweaver, 35.

      The court will release audio recordings of the arguments on the same day they take place.

      The first time that happened was when the court heard argument in the Bush v. Gore case that settled the 2000 presidential election.

      The last occasion was the argument in the Citizens United case that wound up freeing businesses from longstanding limits on political spending.

      Outside groups filed a record 136 briefs on various aspects of the court case.

      The first arguments Monday concern whether the challenge is premature under a 19th century tax law because the insurance requirement doesn't kick in until 2014 and people who remain uninsured wouldn't have to pay a penalty until they file their 2014 income taxes in early 2015.

      Taking this way out of the case would relieve the justices of rendering a decision in political high season, just months before the presidential election.

      The biggest issue before the court is Tuesday's argument over the constitutionality of the individual insurance requirement.

      The states and the National Federation of Independent Business say Congress lacked authority under the Constitution for its unprecedented step of forcing Americans to buy insurance whether they want it or not.

      The administration argues Congress has ample authority to do what it did. If its action was rare, it is only because Congress was dealing with a problem that has stymied Democratic and Republican administrations for many decades: How to get adequate health care to as many people as possible, and at a reasonable cost.

      The justices also will take up whether the rest of the law can remain in place if the insurance mandate falls and, separately, whether Congress lacked the power to expand the Medicaid program to cover 15 million low-income people who currently earn too much to qualify.

      If upheld, the law will force dramatic changes in the way insurance companies do business, including forbidding them from denying coverage due to pre-existing medical conditions and limiting how much they can charge older people.

      The law envisions that insurers will be able to accommodate older and sicker people without facing financial ruin because of its most disputed element, the requirement that Americans have insurance or pay a penalty.

      By 2019, about 95 percent of the country will have health insurance if the law is allowed to take full effect, the Congressional Budget Office estimates.

      Reams of court filings attest that the changes are being counted on by people with chronic diseases, touted by women who have been denied coverage for their pregnancies, and backed by Americans over 50 but not yet old enough to qualify for Medicare, who face age-inflated insurance premiums.

      Republicans are leading the fight to kill the law either by the court or through congressional repeal.

      They say the worst fears about what they derisively call "Obamacare" already have come to pass in the form of higher costs and regulations, claims that the law's supporters dispute.

      The White House says it has little doubt the high court will uphold the law, and that even its opponents will eventually change their tune.

      "One thing I'm confident of is, by the end of this decade, we're going to be very glad the Republicans termed this 'Obamacare,' because when the reality of health care is in place, it's going to be nothing like the kind of fear-mongering that was done," said David Plouffe, a senior adviser to the president, said Sunday in an interview with ABC's "This Week."

      Polls have consistently shown the public is at best ambivalent about the benefits of the health care law, and that a majority of Americans believe the insurance requirement is unconstitutional.

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