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Florida attorney general doesn't want O.J. Simpson in state after release

During a hearing with the parole board in Nevada, O.J. Simpson was granted parole and is set to be released sometime in October. (Nevada Dept. of Corrections)

O.J. Simpson is about to walk out of a Nevada prison, but his next stop is still a mystery.

Simpson told the Nevada Parole Board he wanted to return to Florida where some of his children live, but Florida authorities have now said they don't want him there.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi wrote:

"Floridians are well aware of Mr. Simpson's background ... Our state should not become a country club for this convicted criminal."

The magic date for Simpson's parole is Oct. 1, but since that's a Sunday, it could be next week before he's actually released.

Either way, he will eventually be required to check in with parole and probation -- one more step on his road to freedom.

Back in July, Simpson appeared before the Nevada Parole Board, asking for freedom after nine years behind bars. His request was granted.

Now, the process begins for release.

It's expected Simpson will be transferred from Lovelock Correctional Center to High Desert, near Indian Springs, a clearinghouse for Nevada's inmates on their way out of the system.

Then, he connects with parole and probation in Las Vegas.

However, the exact timeline is unknown.

"We really just want to be careful. We will get this done safely. We have ways, we are equipped to handle releases, high profile or not," said Brooke Keast with the Nevada Department of Prisons.

As for where Simpson will live ... the former football star had expressed interest in moving back to Florida, before the attorney general's statement was released.

"Right now, I'm at the point in my life where all I want to do is spend time with my children and friends," Simpson said back in July.

No matter where he ends up, Simpson is required to follow the rules, including no illegal drugs, no weapons, and no associating with convicted felons.

One of Simpson's former attorneys, Carl Douglas, says the rise of social media could be an issue as Simpson transitions to private life.

"It seems every moment he walks out of his house he's going to be risking the possibility that someone will be recording his every move," said Douglas.

Simpson was convicted of the 2007 armed robbery of two sports memorabilia dealers at Palace Station.

From the beginning, Simpson claimed he was trying to recover personal property that had been stolen from him.

However, the state had a different view, arguing at trial that the use of guns and threats of violence made what happened a crime ... and the jury agreed.

Now, Simpson is about to become a free man, once again.

Simpson was originally sentenced to 9-33 years behind bars. If he violates the parole in any way, he could be returned to the Nevada prison system to serve out the remainder of his time.

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