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Faking the Grade: 98% of DCPS graduates need remedial courses

Faking the Grade: 98% of DCPS graduates need remedial courses (ABC7)

An internal presentation by the University of the District of Columbia presented to the State Board of Education and obtained by the 7 On Your Side I-Team shows that 126 of 128 D.C. Public Schools graduates needed remedial courses once enrolled at UDC.

“It's shocking. We put a lot of faith in our schools to make sure our students are ready for career and college success and it's clear that's not happening,” said State Board Member Joe Weedon. “If the students aren't graduating ready to succeed at UDC or we're inflating graduation rates, that rigor's not there and DCPS and the charter schools where this is happening, are going to have a hard time meeting the needs of the parents.”

UDC freshman Jasmine Holly studies biology at UDC and graduated D.C. Public Schools' Cesar Chavez High School.

“It makes me feel disappointed, but then again, that's not surprising because for D.C. Public Schools, we don’t get as much better education as a school that would probably be a private school. Also, for D.C. public schools, they don’t get the right curriculum, I believe for us to be successful in life. So that number doesn't sound surprising to me.”

Related: Faking The Grade: 7 On Your Side investigates DC Public Schools

Continuing Coverage: Faking The Grade

Related: Former Ballou High School teacher isn't surprised by grade fixing claims

UDC says that while it would prefer to have high school graduates college ready, they are up to the challenge by offering “development courses.”

“Any college would prefer that, but you have to remember, this is a partnership. We take the students where they are,” said Dr. Tony Summers, UDC’s Chief Community Services Officer.

7 On Your Side I-Team Investigator Nathan Baca has been covering a grade-fixing investigation at Ballou High School, where it has been alleged that teachers were pressured to fake student's grades in order to increase the school's graduation rate, despite many students' chronic absences.


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